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Database of Teaching Sources

A database of selected, reviewed, tested, assessed and validated e-learning based language teaching sources addressed to Higher education students for the learning of 18 different European languages.

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Podcast and Blog 'Talk Like Antanas'

Date of Publication

2017-present

Target Group

Students

Domain Area

Learning Scenario

Autonomous learning

Target Language

Lithuanian

Language of Instruction

English
Any language

CEFR level

A1
A2
B1

Type of Material

Activity/task
Audio
Video

Linguistic Features

Vocabulary
Grammar
Pragmatics
Prosody

Skills

Listening
Reading

Description

The podcast and blog 'Talk Like Antanas' is designed to help learners get to grips with Lithuanian vocabulary and grammar. The blog is written to learners from abroad who live in Lithuania or who wish to learn Lithuanian. It deals with general topics of interest to, primarily, lower level learners.

Case study

The videos and blog cover interesting topics and problem areas identified by a teacher through teaching learners of Lithuanian. As a lifelong learner of languages and as someone who has not taken formal classes for a long time, the materials serve as useful revision of things I once knew or should know, or are new to me. The videos and blog posts are short enough to fit into a busy schedule. There is no follow up, though. The podcasts don't follow any specific syllabus and can therefore only be used on an ad-hoc basis.

Guidelines

The resource can be used a supplementary and stimulating material to maintain someone's language level. They are best suited to self-study use for extra exposure to Lithuanian. There are no activities to check understanding as the podcast and blog posts are more for passive learning. However, they could be incorporated into class activities by a teacher or set as extra practice for homework. The fact that new materials are regularly produced is positive as it means that learners continually receive updated and relevant materials to their inbox or podcast app. This is motivating and provides authentic content (which is sometimes lacking in generic materials published years ago).

Review

Category
Rate
Comprehensive approach
Capacity to match the needs of lecturers and students

4

Added value
The provided tangible improvements

4

Motivation enhancement
The capacity to motivate students to improve their language skills

4

Innovation
Effectiveness in introducing innovative, creative and previously unknown approaches to LSP learning

3

Transferability
Measurement of the transferable potential and possibility to be a source of further capitalisation/application for other language projects in different countries

3

Skills assessment and validation
Availability of appropriate tools for lecturers to monitor students’ progress and for students to assess own progress and to reflect on learning

2

Adaptability
Flexibility of the contents and possibilities for the LSP lecturers to adapt the contents to their and to students’ need

2

Usability
Assess the technical usability from the point of view of the lecturer and the student

4

Accessibility
Assess the accessibility from the point of view of the lecturer and the student

5

Comments:
The resources are freely available. They are created as added-value content by a teacher to try and entice people to sign up for courses. The content is delivered in an accessible way, and emphasis is placed on the language as it is actually used (taking a descriptivist approach to language learning rather than a prescriptivist approach). They could be used by students for their self-learning or in combination with a course book or classroom practice.
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